You can also get your free Experian credit score and a credit report card that are updated every 14 days on Credit.com. Your credit report card shows where you stand in the five key areas that make up your score—payment history, credit utilization, account mix, credit age and inquiries. Your report card also gives you tips on how to improve your standing in each area if needed. And checking your report card and score doesn’t hurt your credit in any way.
There are a variety of debt relief methods you can use that actually work. Some common strategies include doing it yourself through careful budgeting and by negotiating plans with your creditors, working with a nonprofit credit counselor, getting a debt consolidation loan, using a debt management program, working with a debt settlement company, and even filing for bankruptcy. Some of these strategies, such as debt settlement and bankruptcy, may have significant adverse financial consequences, so it’s necessary to carefully weigh your options before signing up for a debt relief program. 
It can happen seemingly overnight. No matter how hard you tried to manage your spending, you’re suddenly faced with credit card debt you can’t pay. You try to pay your cards down, but that taps into the money you’d usually use for groceries and you find yourself using your card, again, to make those purchases. The stress your credit card bills cause is impacting your entire life, and you’re not sure how to make it stop.
A second option is consumer credit counseling. There is any number of consumer credit counseling agencies available on the Internet or you may be able to find one locally. The best of these are nonprofits. When you contact one of these agencies either via a website or in person you will have a counselor that will spend from 45 minutes to an hour with you discussing your finances. The best of these agencies charge nothing for that service.
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